Document library


Title
Decription
Download

Water is one of the most important factors of successful livestock production. If water quality is poor livestock drink less. When livestock drink less, they eat less, lose condition and have less milk. These Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia, pages cover: water salinity, blue-green algae, contamination, water testing and where to get more information.

Read more about water quality for livestock on the Western Australia government website.

This factsheet provides information on determining which calves require treatment for scours, how to select and use oral electrolyte solutions for best results and when to consult your veterinarian during a calf scours outbreak.

Download a copy of Tips & Tools: Treating calf scours (PDF, 187KB) from Meat & Livestock Australia.

This publication has been compiled to offer best practice management options to land managers dealing with weedy Sporobolus grasses to optimise control strategy success and return on investment. Weedy Sporobolus grasses include giant rat’s tail grass (GRT) and giant Parramatta grass. This manual takes a strategic approach to weed management. A variety of common weed ‘situations’ are examined, and a ‘best bet’ strategy presented for each. These ‘best bet’ strategies are based on the latest research, and focus on achieving effective weed control in a cost-efficient way.

This revised edition was updated by Steven Bray (Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries) and David Officer (New South Wales Department of Primary Industries), Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries, Queensland, 2007.

Download a copy of the Weedy Sporobolus grasses: best practice manual (PDF, 1 MB).

1.20 MB
download

In many regions of northern Australia, phosphorus is a serious nutritional limitation to cattle production. Phosphorus deficiency results in poor performance in most of the factors that make beef production efficient and profitable. This book outlines general principles that can be applied to strategies and practices when feeding phosphorus to beef cattle.

Download a copy of Phosphorus management of beef cattle in northern Australia (PDF, 2.13 MB) from Meat & Livestock Australia.

The aim of Pastures: Mackay Whitsunday region – a guide for developing productive and sustainable pasture-fed grazing systems is to provide information and knowledge on sown and native pasture systems in a form readily accessible to Mackay Whitsunday region’s graziers and land managers. It contains an overview of the Mackay Whitsunday region and its beef industry profile, pasture-fed beef production options, land types, sown pasture species information (selection, establishment and management), special purpose pastures, and weeds and legislation. Compiled by the Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries, Queensland, 2007.

Download a copy of Pastures: Mackay Whitsunday region – a guide for developing productive and sustainable pasture-fed grazing systems (PDF, 2 MB).

1.57 MB
download

Introduced pasture species have an important role in the Katherine region as special purpose pastures within a predominantly native pasture grazing system. While useful, they are unlikely to replace native pastures as the primary source of feed for extensive cattle herds in this region due to climatic and financial constraints. Part 1 (PDF, 52 KB) describes the various introduced pasture species available for the Katherine region. Part 2 (this Agnote) outlines some of the more common uses of these species. Authors: D. Parker and M. Cobiac, Department of Primary Industries, Northern Territory (2002).

Download a copy of An introduction to the pastures of the Katherine region: Part 2 Common uses for introduced species (PDF, 147 KB) from the Department of Primary Industry and Resources.

Native pastures are the primary source of feed for cattle production in the Katherine region. Introduced species have an important role as special purpose pastures. Part 1 (this Agnote) briefly describes the major pasture species and Part 2 (PDF, 147 KB) outlines the common uses of introduced pastures. Authors: D. Parker and M. Cobiac, Department of Primary Industries, Northern Territory (2002).

Download a copy of An introduction to the pastures of the Katherine region: Part 1 Native and introduced species (PDF, 52 KB) from the Department of Primary Industry and Resources.

This Agnote lists species of grasses and legumes that can be sown as improved pastures for grazing or for the production of fodder in the monsoonal rainfall zone of the Northern Territory. This zone is defined as having a distinct wet season with over 600mm annual rainfall. Authors: Arthur Cameron and Barry Lemcke, Department of Primary Industry and Resources, Northern Territory, 2014.

Download a copy of Pasture species sowing guide for the Top End (DOCX, 88 KB) from the Department of Primary Industry and Resources.

The beef industry is a major contributor to the wealth of the inland Burnett region and this valuable industry relies on productive pastures. This booklet aims to help all grazing property managers, from those on small grazing blocks to properties of 10,000ha or more, better understand the development and management of pastures suited to the region. Compiled by Damien O’Sullivan, Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation, Queensland (2009).

Download a copy of Pasture management for the inland Burnett (PDF, 2 MB).

2.36 MB
download

Pasture establishment covers: cultivar selection, planting material, seed quality, seeding or planting rate, time of sowing, controlling competing vegetation, ground preparation, seed treatment, planting methods, managing new pastures, and what to avoid. Author: Arthur Cameron, Department of Primary Industry and Resources, Northern Territory, 2013.

Download a copy of Pasture establishment (PDF, 1.21 MB) from the Department of Primary Industry and Resources.

  • 4
  • 14