Knowledge centre articles

Pasture dieback only affects tropical and sub-tropical grasses, causing premature death and unthrifty growth. Pastures in eastern Queensland are affected, specifically north and Central Queensland, Wide Bay Burnett and south-east Queensland. Dieback in tropical grass-pastures was confirmed in north-east New South Wales in early 2020.

Most sown grass-pasture species commonly found in southern, central and northern Queensland have been affected by dieback.
Some native grass-pasture species such as black speargrass, forest bluegrass and golden beard grass have also been reported to have been affected…

Genomic information is playing an increasingly important role in genetic evaluation for beef cattle breeders. As genotyping becomes more common, it is the quality and quantity of phenotypes for economically important traits…
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The evolution of the Animal Equivalent (AE) system in Australia is progressing to a new approach in comparing animals of different weights, classes and species with a fit-for-purpose inclusion of predicting feed…
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The Lender Ready Program – Your Questions (PDF 0.73 MB)The Lender Ready Program – A Producer’s perspective on accessing finance (PDF. 0.43 MB) Becoming Lender Ready – What do Lenders want and…
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It’s important for graziers to know where to access the most up-to-date and accurate climate-related information. Graziers know that the impact of a La Nina event varies across the different regions of northern…
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